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Philharmonic 'Most Progressive Institution on Lincoln Center Plaza': The New Yorker

Posted October 14, 2014

In a review of the all-Nielsen concerts, October 1–3, The New Yorker's classical music critic Alex Ross wrote:

The New York Philharmonic, keeping up the exploratory urge that it displayed in its inaugural Biennial festival, last spring, remains the most progressive institution on the Lincoln Center plaza. In the first weeks of the season, it offered a vibrant new clarinet concerto by Unsuk Chin, with ear-cleansing solos by the Finnish virtuoso Kari Kriikku; and a concert devoted to the perennially neglected Danish master Carl Nielsen, part of the orchestra’s multi-year Nielsen Project, which also includes recordings for the Dacapo label. Alan Gilbert, the Philharmonic’s music director, has a flair for devising programs that extend and refresh the repertory rather than recycle it ad nauseam.

Ross described Gilbert’s rendition of Nielsen's Fifth Symphony as "confident, majestic, relentless; the roiling crescendo at the center of the second movement bested the Bernstein version." Of the Sixth, "an onslaught of fractured forms and fractious sounds," he wrote: "Gilbert found a through-line in the rumpus, and elicited an ovation from the audience. The concert had the feeling of an event."

Read more reviews of these concerts.