Very Young People's Concerts: "Make Believe"

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Calendar

Very Young People's Concerts: "Make-Believe"

Location

Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse

Directions
Price Range

$18

Duration

1 hour

Date & Times

14

Apr, 2018

Saturday, 4:00 PM

Event Info

A part of the Big Umbrella Festival
An Arts Festival for Children on the Autism Spectrum and their Families


Visual Schedule and Vocabulary

Imagine having a playdate with the Orchestra — where musical instruments are toys, songs become games, and we can make-believe whatever our hearts desire! Join Philippe the Penguin and musicians of the New York Philharmonic to make new friends and share in the fun of music.

Designed by Philharmonic musicians together with faculty of Columbia University’s Teacher’s College, Very Young People’s Concerts combine games, storytelling, and great music in one fun-filled hour that unlocks children’s imagination and talent.

This Very Young People’s Concert includes:

Fun with the Philharmonic: pre-concert musical games with musicians
The Concert: a half-hour hosted performance, including audience participation and story with Philippe the Penguin

Learn more about Very Young People's Concerts
 

Program

Martinů

La Revue de cuisine Suite, for Clarinet, Bassoon, Trumpet, Violin, Cello and Piano, H.161

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Artists

Amy Zoloto

Clarinet, Bass Clarinet

Amy Zoloto

Clarinet, Bass Clarinet

Amy Zoloto

Clarinet, Bass Clarinet

Bass clarinetist Amy Zoloto joined the New York Philharmonic in June 2016. Previously, she was the bass clarinet / utility clarinet of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra (2014–16), played as a substitute with the New York Philharmonic (2009–14), and was a member of the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra.

Amy Zoloto has performed and toured with The Philadelphia Orchestra, The Metropolitan Opera, New York City Opera, Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra, and American Symphony Orchestra. She has participated in the Bard Music Festival, Colorado Music Festival, and Pacific Music Festival in Sapporo, Japan.

As a chamber musician, Ms. Zoloto has appeared in New York Philharmonic Ensembles chamber series, was a member of the Sylvan Winds, and toured Europe with the Jeunesse Musicale Wind Quintet. As a teacher, she has conducted master classes at the Manhattan School of Music, coached the New York Youth Symphony, and was an adjunct professor at University of Florida.

A Chicago native, Ms. Zoloto is a graduate of DePaul University, where she studied with Larry Combs, retired principal clarinet of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, and performed for two years with the Civic Orchestra of Chicago. She completed further studies with Frank Kowalsky. She is a Buffet Crampon USA performing artist.

Learn more about Amy Zoloto

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Roger Nye

Bassoon

Roger Nye

Bassoon

Roger Nye

Bassoon

Bassoonist Roger Nye joined the New York Philharmonic in September 2005 after serving as the second bassoonist of the Omaha Symphony for 11 seasons. Raised in Michigan, he attended the Interlochen Arts Academy for the last two years of high school, where he studied with Robert Barris, now bassoon instructor at Northwestern University. Mr. Nye earned his bachelor of music degree from the Eastman School of Music, where he was a student of K. David Van Hoesen; he continued his studies at the USC School of Music, where he received his master’s in bassoon performance with Norman Herzberg, son-in-law and student of former New York Philharmonic second bassoonist Simon Kovar.

While a student at the Eastman School he participated in two important recording projects. The first: playing contrabassoon on the Eastman Wind Ensemble’s recording of cornet solos with Wynton Marsalis; the second, playing contrabassoon on the Eastman Philharmonia’s recording, with flutist Sir James Galway, of the world premiere of John Corigliano’s Pied Piper Fantasy. Other recordings of note include the Sydney Symphony Orchestra’s recording of Stravinsky’s complete Firebird (as principal bassoon) with Edo De Waart conducting. Mr. Nye moved to Sydney, Australia, with his wife, oboist Caroline Park, in 1997, after winning the position of principal bassoon there. He has also served as principal bassoon of the Buffalo Philharmonic and the South Dakota Symphony.

In summer, Mr. Nye has performed with the National Repertory Orchestra, where he was soloist with violinist Joseph Silverstein in Haydn’s Sinfonia Concertante, and at the Peninsula Music Festival, Door County, Wisconsin, where he served as both principal and solo bassoon. He resides in New Jersey with his wife, Caroline, and their son, Zeke.

Learn more about Roger Nye

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Christopher Martin

Trumpet

Christopher Martin

Trumpet

Christopher Martin New York Philharmonic

Trumpet

Christopher Martin joined the New York Philharmonic as Principal Trumpet, The Paula Levin Chair, in September 2016. He served as principal trumpet of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra (CSO) for 11 seasons, and enjoyed a distinctive career of almost 20 years in many of America’s finest orchestras, including as principal trumpet of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and associate principal trumpet of The Philadelphia Orchestra. He made his New York Philharmonic solo debut in October 2016, performing Ligeti’s The Mysteries of the Macabre, led by then Music Director Alan Gilbert.

Praised as a musician of “effortless understated virtuosity” by The Chicago Tribune, Christopher Martin has appeared as soloist multiple times nationally and internationally with the CSO and music director Riccardo Muti. Highlights of Mr. Martin’s solo appearances include the 2012 World Premiere of Christopher Rouse’s concerto Heimdall’s Trumpet; Panufnik’s Concerto in modo antico, with Mr. Muti; a program of 20th-century French concertos by André Jolivet and Henri Tomasi; and more than a dozen performances of J.S. Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 2. Other solo engagements have included Mr. Martin with the Australian Chamber Orchestra, Seiji Ozawa’s Saito Kinen Festival, Atlanta and Alabama Symphony Orchestras, and the National Symphony Orchestra of Mexico. Christopher Martin’s discography includes a solo trumpet performance in John Williams’s score to Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln (2012), the National Brass Ensemble’s Gabrieli album, and CSO Resound label recordings, including the 2011 release of CSO Brass Live.

Dedicated to music education, Mr. Martin has served on the faculty of Northwestern University and coached the Civic Orchestra of Chicago. In 2010 he co-founded the National Brass Symposium with his brother Michael Martin, a trumpeter in the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and in 2016 he received the Edwin Franko Goldman Memorial Citation from the American Bandmasters Association for outstanding contributions to the wind band genre. Christopher Martin and his wife, Margaret — an organist and pianist — enjoy performing together in recital and, most especially, for their daughter, Claire.

Learn more about Christopher Martin

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Quan Ge

Violin

Quan Ge

Violin

Quen Ge

Violin

Violinist Quan Ge joined the New York Philharmonic in June 2009. She holds a bachelor's degree from The Curtis Institute of Music, where she worked with Yumi Scott, Ida Kavafian, and Jaime Laredo, and a master's degree from The Juilliard School, where she studied with David Chan. A native of Huai Nan, China, Ms. Ge was the recipient of a Fu Chen Xian Scholarship, and has won top prizes in both the China National Competition and the Jeunesses Music Competition (Romania). While a student at Curtis, she played as a substitute with The Philadelphia Orchestra. Ms. Ge is an active chamber musician and recitalist, and most recently worked with pianist Robert McDonald and the Borromeo String Quartet at the Taos School of Music in 2008.

Learn more about Quan Ge

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Alexei Yupanqui Gonzales

Cello

Alexei Yupanqui Gonzales

Cello

Gonzalez

Cello

Alexei Yupanqui Gonzales was appointed to the cello section of the New York Philharmonic in November 2012. He has served as the principal cellist of the Rhode Island Philharmonic and the Boston Lyric Opera. He has also been a member of the Boston Ballet Orchestra and has performed with the Boston Symphony, Boston Pops, A Far Cry Chamber Orchestra, Emmanuel Music under the late Craig Smith, and the Bach Ensemble with harpsichordist John Gibbons.

An avid chamber musician, Mr. Gonzales has performed in various concert venues including Jordan Hall, Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Seattle Town Hall, Currier Museum of Art, and the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. He won first prize in the Coleman International Chamber Competition with the Azure Trio, and he was a recipient of the Borromeo String Quartet Artist Award. He has also taught chamber music at the New England Conservatory Preparatory School.

Mr. Gonzales was a Tanglewood Music Center Fellow for three summers, where he received the Samuel Mayes Memorial Prize and participated in the Bach Institute Seminar. He has spent other summers at the Schleswig-Holstein Music Festival, Banff, the International Music Arts Institute, and the Killington Music Festival.

Mr. Gonzales studied with Laurence Lesser and Paul Katz at the New England Conservatory of Music. The son of Peruvian and German immigrants, Mr. Gonzales was raised in Andover, Massachusetts. Currently, he lives in Manhattan with his wife, Mie, an oboist. He is an avid Bayern Munich soccer fan.

Learn more about Alexei Yupanqui Gonzales

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Eric Huebner

Piano

Eric Huebner

Piano

Eric Huebner

Piano

Pianist Eric Huebner joined the roster of the New York Philharmonic in January 2012. A native of Los Angeles, he is a graduate of The Juilliard School, where he studied with Jerome Lowenthal, and has been a guest pianist with the Philharmonic since 2004. Mr. Huebner has been featured in orchestral works by Stravinsky, Ives, R. Strauss, and Milhaud, among others.

In June 2012 he will perform as soloist with Musicians from the Philharmonic in the World Premiere of Elliott Carter’s Two Controversies and a Conversation — a double concerto for piano and percussion with percussionist Colin Currie — on the CONTACT! program, conducted by David Robertson.

An active soloist and chamber musician, Mr. Huebner has twice been a featured recitalist at the Ojai Festival in California. He has also appeared on the Monday Evening Concerts and Piano Spheres series in Los Angeles in addition to solo appearances at the Carlsbad Music Festival, Miller Theater and (le) Poisson Rouge. He has performed at Zankel Hall as soloist in Ligeti’s Piano Concerto and at Alice Tully Hall in Messiaen’s Oiseaux Exotiques, both conducted by David Robertson. Since 2001 Mr. Huebner has been a member of Antares, a quartet comprising clarinet, violin, cello, and piano. A first-prize winner of the 2002 Concert Artists Guild International Competition, Antares has performed in major chamber music venues throughout the United States.

Eric Huebner is currently assistant professor of piano at the University at Buffalo, where he maintains an active piano studio and performs as part of the Slee Sinfonietta. He has recorded a wide variety of solo piano and chamber music for the Col Legno, Centaur, Bridge, Albany, Tzadik, Innova, New Focus Recordings, and Mode Records labels.

Learn more about Eric Huebner

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Rebecca Young

Host

Rebecca Young

Host

Rebecca Young

Host

Rebecca Young joined the New York Philharmonic in 1986 as its youngest member. In 1991 she won the position of Associate Principal Viola. Two months later she was named principal viola of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. After spending the 1992–93 season in Boston and two summers at Tanglewood, she ultimately decided to return to her family in New York, resuming her Associate Principal position with the Philharmonic in September 1994. She can currently be seen leading the viola section of the All-Star Orchestra, a popular televised educational series about classical music.

An avid chamber musician, Ms. Young has performed with many renowned groups, including the Boston Chamber Music Society, Boston Symphony Chamber Players, New York Philharmonic Ensembles, and The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. She can be heard in a recording of Schubert’s Trout Quintet with cellist Yo-Yo Ma, pianist Emanuel Ax, violinist Pamela Frank, and bass player Edgar Meyer on the Sony Classical label.

In the spring of 1999 Ms. Young joined Philharmonic Principal Viola Cynthia Phelps in the World Premiere of Sofia Gubaidulina’s Two Paths: Music for Two Solo Violas and Symphony Orchestra with the Philharmonic. The work was commissioned for them by Tomoko Masur, wife of Philharmonic Music Director Emeritus Kurt Masur and herself a former violist. The two performed it at Avery Fisher Hall, in Washington, D.C., and again during the Orchestra’s subsequent tour of the Canary Islands, Spain, and Portugal, as well as the Europe 2000 Tour, and again in April 2011, at Avery Fisher Hall. Ms. Young is a graduate of The Juilliard School.

Ms. Young was first introduced to music at the age of two when her parents took her to the New York Philharmonic’s Young People’s Concerts led by Leonard Bernstein. Today, she is the host of the Philharmonic’s popular Very Young Peoples Concerts, intimate chamber music concerts where she has tap-danced, played drums, ridden a scooter around the stage, and even sung Gilbert & Sullivan. Her philosophy is less to educate than, as she puts it, “to make the audiences have so much fun they want to come back!”

Learn more about Rebecca Young

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Doug Fitch

Designer, Director

Doug Fitch

Designer, Director

Doug Fitch

Designer, Director

Visual artist, designer, and director Doug Fitch’s Giants Are Small productions for Alan Gilbert and the New York Philharmonic include Ligeti’s Le Grand Macabre (cited as the top opera of 2010 by The New York Times, New York magazine, and Time Out New York), Janáček’s The Cunning Little Vixen (2011, New York magazine’s “Best Classical Event of the Year”), A Dancer’s Dream: Two Works by Stravinsky (2013, later screened in movie theaters worldwide); and HK Gruber’s Gloria – A Pig Tale (2014, with forces from The Juilliard School as part of the NY PHIL BIENNIAL). This fall Mr. Fitch was the inaugural WBFO visiting artist at SUNY, where he created an opera of images, How Did We...? In 2013 he directed and performed in the premiere of Matthew Suttor’s musical setting of Blaise Cendrar’s poem La Prose du Transsibérien et de la Petite Jehanne de France with the Taos Chamber Music Group. He has created productions for Los Angeles Opera, Los Angeles Philharmonic, and Santa Fe Opera, and directed projects for Canada’s National Arts Centre, Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra, and Tanglewood (Elliot Carter’s What Next?, screened at The Museum of Modern Art). Doug Fitch’s creative life began with his family’s touring puppet theater. While studying visual arts at Harvard University, he collaborated with director Peter Sellars, including on of Wagner’s Der Ring des Nibelungen. He also studied cooking at Paris’s La Varenne and design at Institut d’Architecture et d’Etudes Urbaines in Strasbourg, France. He emerged as an architectural designer in the 1980s, and collaborated with Mimi Oka on edible art installations called Orphic Feasts, leading to their book, Orphic Fodder. Other projects have included Robert Wilson’s Civil Wars (at the American Repertory Theatre) and Jim Henson of The Muppets (in England). In co-production with Universal Music and Deutsche Grammophon, Mr. Fitch, Edouard Getaz, and Frederic Gumy are developing Peter+Wolf in Hollywood for an iPad app, CD, digital album, and live show.

Learn more about Doug Fitch

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